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The Urns 





Doris IV. Jaeger 


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIES 












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IMPORTANT DATES 

Aug. 15—Summer Session ends 
Oct. 4—Last day for program 
changes 

Nov. 4—Holiday 
Nov. 27-29—Holidays 
Dec. 22-Jan 4—Holidays 
Jan. 21—Examinations 
Jan. 21-Feb. 3—Registration 
Feb. 4—Spring Session begins 


THEATRE BUREAU 

We offer two services— 

(1) Tickets for operas, concerts and 
theatres at reduced rates, running as 
low as one-half the box office prices. 

(2) Tickets for other performances, at 
the box office price, plus a small service 
fee. 

The Bureau is assured the best avail¬ 
able seats. 

This service, which saves time and 
inconvenience, is growing in popularity. 
A bulletin is mailed out weekly. Leave 
your address at the Bureau. 

Telephone , University 3200 
Extension 675 

RARE BOOKS 

This department searches for rare, 
out-of-print and technical items. In¬ 
formation is given freely. Every stu¬ 
dent should acquaint himself with the 
subject of rare books; a subject of in¬ 
creasing importance, interest, and 
financial prominence in the book world. 
Patrons may leave their names with the 
Rare Book Department and receive 
without any obligation regular quota¬ 
tions on items of interest to them. 

Telephone , University 3200 

Extension 103 or 142 


IMPORTANT DATES 

March 2—Last day— 

Fellowship applications 
Master’s degree applications 
April 1—Last day—Doctor’s 
degree applications 
April 2-6—Holidays 
May 1—Choose 1931-32 Studies 
May 18—Examinations 
May 20—File Master’s Essays 
May 30—Holiday 
May 31—Baccalaureate 
June 2—Tuesday, Degrees Con¬ 
ferred 

(over) 



















Campus Book Mark 

THE LOWER FLOOR 


The plan of the Bookstore organiza¬ 
tion provides that the lower floor shall 
be devoted to the general needs of stu¬ 
dents and faculty members. Here will 
be found stationery, jewelry, fountain 
pens, gift ware, drawing instruments, 
laboratory supplies, sports goods, film 
developing service, picture framing 
service, men's furnishings, miscellan¬ 
eous articles, and the Soda Fountain^ ^ < 

Telephone ITnivprstfv ^700 


Telephone, University 3200 

Extension 344 or 672 

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TYPEWRITER 

DEPARTMENT 


We carry all of the standard portable 
typewriters, new and second hand. 
They may be purchased outright, on 
installment, or rented. Discounts are 
made as large as possible. A repair 
man is always available. Prices for 
repair jobs are lower than elsewhere, 
and the work guaranteed. No student 
should deprive himself of a typewriter. 
It costs little to rent one for an experi¬ 
ment in efficiency. 

Telephone, University 3200 

Extension 672 or 344 

(over) 


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 























LIBRARY 

C. J. Martin 




Columbia 

UNIVERSITY 

IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK 


PHOTOGRAPHIC 

STUDIES 


Published by 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

MORNINGSIDE HEIGHTS 


NEW YORK 


Copyright 1920 
Columbia University 
n the City of New York 








ROBERT L STILLSON 
COMPANY NEW YORK 



THE UNIVERSITY 


I N these modern days the University is 
not apart from the activities of the 
world, but in them and of them. It 
deals with real problems and it relates it¬ 
self to life as it is. The University is for 
both Scholarship and Service; and herein 
lies that ethical quality which makes the 
University a real person, bound by its 
very nature to the service of others. To 
fulfil its high calling the University must 
give and give freely to its students, to the 
world of learning and of scholarship, to 
the development of trade, commerce and 
industry, to the community in which it 
has its home, and to the state and nation 
whose foster child it is. A University’s 
capacity for service is the rightful measure 
of its importunity. The University’s 
service is today far greater, far more ex¬ 
pensive, and in ways far more numerous 
than ever before. It has only lately 


learned to serve, and hence it has only 
lately learned the possibilities that lie 
open before it. Every legitimate demand 
for guidance, for leadership, for expert 
knowledge, for trained skill, for personal 
service, it is the bounden duty of the 
University to meet. It may not urge that 
it is too busy accumulating stores of learn¬ 
ing and teaching students. Serve it must, 
as well as accumulate and teach, upon 
pain of loss of moral power and impair¬ 
ment of usefulness. 


—From President Butler's Inaugural Address , 1902 



MINERVA 
C. J. Martin 







EARL HALL —SPRING 

Antoinette B. Hervey 


















NORTH GATE AND HOUSEHOLD ARTS 
C. J. Martin 









ILLUMINATION 

Doris W. Jaeger 













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PHILOSOPHY 

Siegried, M. Upton 



CHAPEL COLUMNS —LATE AFTERNOON 

C. J. Martin 




CHAPEL 

Antoinette B. Ilervey 






COLUMNS 

Antoinette B. Hervey 

















KENT AND HAMILTON 

C. J. Marlin 






LIBRARY —MAY 

Antoinette B. Hervey 








CHAPEL —SOUTH DOOR 
Antoinette B. Hervey 






TREES 

Mrs. Sterling Smith 





SENTINELS 
Hilda Altschul 









FACULTY CLUB 

Miss Louise Martin 





AVERY 

C. J. Marlin 











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